Upcoming events

    • Tuesday, December 18, 2018
    • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • XO on Elm 827 Elm Street, Manchester, NH 03101
    • 22
    Register

    Thank you Home Hospitality Hosts

    Join us for a night of appreciation of our home hospitality hosts, who so generously open their homes to our international visitors.  This will be an opportunity to thank current hosts and to expand this opportunity out to new hosts as well. Please feel free to invite others who may be interested in learning more about this program, as it will be a great opportunity for them to learn more.  Hors d'oeuvres will be provided, along with a cash bar.

    6:00 pm 

    XO On Elm

    827 Elm Street, Manchester

    Open to the Public, Prior Registration Required

    More about Home Hospitality

    For many of our international visitor groups, the World Affairs Council of New Hampshire provides them with the opportunity to visit a local home for an informal dinner.  These dinners are great chances for people from around the world to learn more about the United States and for their hosts to learn about other countries.  These dinners can be as informal as you like, as people always remember the discussions the best. Groups range in size from 2 people to 24 and they come with interpreters, if need be.  It is a wonderful way to engage with our visitors and to make international friends. Many of our hosts have visited the people they have met when they travel internationally.

    More about the International Visitor Program

    The International Visitor Leadership Program is the premier international exchange program run by the US Department of State.  By bringing over 5,000 international visitors to the country and having them travel to different cities, over a three week period, this program gives visitors the opportunity to learn what the US is really like. Through professional meetings, the groups learn about best practices in the US, which they can take back and adopt the parts that work well in their country. WACNH hosts around 275 visitors per year, showing them around the state. Over the years, the Council has hosted over 2,500 visitors from more than 175 different countries.

    • Wednesday, February 06, 2019
    • 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
    • UNH Manchester 88 Commercial Street Manchester NH
    Register


    Global Tipping Points with the Union of Concerned Scientists

    Global Tipping Points

    A three-part series on today's global challenges

    Wednesday, February 6th, 6 PM-7:15 PM


    Lisbeth Gronlund, Co-Director of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, will be


    Location: Multi-purpose Room, UNH Manchester, 88 Commercial Street (Pandora Mill), Manchester. Directions & Parking Info Here. (For safety and storm closure information, check here


    Tickets:

    WACNH Members, UNH Students and Staff- Free

    General Public- $10

    About Lisbeth Gronlund


    Dr. Lisbeth Gronlund focuses on technical and policy issues related to nuclear weapons, ballistic missile defenses, and space weapons. She has authored numerous articles and reports, lectured on nuclear arms control and missile defense policy issues before lay and expert audiences, and testified before Congress. A long list of news organizations, including the New York Times and NPR, have cited Gronlund since she joined UCS in 1992.

    Since 1990, Dr. Gronlund has been a primary organizer of the International Summer Symposiums on Science and World Affairs, which foster cooperation among scientists around the world working on arms control and security issues. She is the co-recipient of the 2001 Joseph A. Burton Forum Award of the American Physical Society (APS) “for creative and sustained leadership in building an international arms-control-physics community and for her excellence in arms control physics.” She also is a fellow of the APS and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    Before joining the Union of Concerned Scientists, Dr. Gronlund was an SSRC-MacArthur Foundation fellow in international peace and security at the University of Maryland and a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Defense and Arms Control Studies Program. She has a doctorate degree in theoretical physics from Cornell University.

    History of Union of Concerned Scientists

    UCS was founded in 1969 by scientists and students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. That year, the Vietnam War was at its height and Cleveland’s heavily polluted Cuyahoga River had caught fire. Appalled at how the U.S. government was misusing science, the UCS founders drafted a statement calling for scientific research to be directed away from military technologies and toward solving pressing environmental and social problems.

    We remain true to that founding vision. Throughout our history, UCS has followed the example set by the scientific community: we share information, seek the truth, and let our findings guide our conclusions.

    It’s a powerful formula.

    By mobilizing scientists and combining their voices with those of advocates, educators, business people, and other concerned citizens, UCS has built a reputation for fairness and accuracy and amassed an impressive history of accomplishments.

    Presented in partnership with UNH Manchester's homeland security, history, humanities and politics and society programs.

         

    • Wednesday, February 27, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM (EST)
    • Red River Theatres
    • 110
    Register


    Finding Refuge: Crossroads Film and Discussion Series

    The Human Flow

    Wednesday, March 20th, 7 PM

    Red River Theatres 

    11 S Main St #L1

    Concord, NH 03301


    Tickets are free for the public, but space is limited. Reserve your tickets today!

    About The Human Flow:

    Over 65 million people around the world have been forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change and war in the greatest human displacement since World War II. Human Flow, an epic film journey led by the internationally renowned artist Ai Weiwei, gives a powerful visual expression to this massive human migration. The documentary elucidates both the staggering scale of the refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact. Captured over the course of an eventful year in 23 countries, the film follows a chain of urgent human stories that stretches across the globe in countries including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, France, Greece, Germany, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, and Turkey. Human Flow is a witness to its subjects and their desperate search for safety, shelter and justice: from teeming refugee camps to perilous ocean crossings to barbed-wire borders; from dislocation and disillusionment to courage, endurance and adaptation; from the haunting lure of lives left behind to the unknown potential of the future. Human Flow comes at a crucial time when tolerance, compassion and trust are needed more than ever. This visceral work of cinema is a testament to the unassailable human spirit and poses one of the questions that will define this century: Will our global society emerge from fear, isolation, and self-interest and choose a path of openness, freedom, and respect for humanity?

    Watch the Trailer:

    This project was made possible with support from New Hampshire Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities. Learn more at www.nhhumanities.org.

    • Monday, March 04, 2019
    • 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
    • UNH Manchester
    Register


    Global Tipping Points

    A three-part series on today's global challenges

    Monday, March 4th, 6 PM-7:15 PM


    Location: Multi-purpose Room, UNH Manchester, 88 Commercial Street (Pandora Mill), Manchester. Directions & Parking Info Here. (For safety and storm closure information, check here

    Tickets:

    WACNH Members, UNH Students and Staff- Free

    General Public- $10

    Melinda’s talk will be about social movements in Turkey and the impact they have on the state.

    About Melinda Negrón-Gonzales


    Melinda Negrón-Gonzales is Program Coordinator of the Politics and Society Program. She has taught at UNH since fall 2008 and teaches courses on international relations and comparative politics.

    Negrón-Gonzales's research interests span the following areas: international politics, Turkish Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, humanitarian intervention/responsibility to protect/human security, social movements, and democratization. She seeks to understand political and social change.

    One strand of her research looks at changing ideas about humanitarian intervention - when the international community (working through the United Nations) attempts to prevent and respond to genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Recently, she's written about the international community's response to the humanitarian crisis in Syria, and also the Organization for Islamic Cooperation's response to ISIS terrorism in the Middle East and North Africa. 

    Negrón-Gonzales also conducts research on social and political change in Turkey, specifically exploring how social movements work to push democratization in Turkey. For example, one of her recent publications examines how feminist activists in Turkey have attempted to shape legislative reform and advance women's rights under an Islamic conservative government.

    Presented in partnership with UNH Manchester's homeland security, history, humanities and politics and society programs.

         

    • Sunday, March 10, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • Southern NH University - Dining Center
    Register

    Registration for NH Academic WorldQuest teams!

    Please register your team(s) and pay online or by mailing a check to the WACNH office: 2500 North River Rd. Manchester, NH 03106

    For more detailed information about the competition, please visit our AWQ page. 


    • Tuesday, March 19, 2019
    • 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM
    • UNH Manchester 88 Commercial Street, Manchester, NH
    Register

    Global Tipping Points with Katherine Brown:

    The Press and Diplomacy in Afghanistan


    Global Tipping Points

    A three-part series on today's global challenges

    Tuesday, March 19th, 6 PM-7:15 PM


    Location: Multi-purpose Room, UNH Manchester, 88 Commercial Street (Pandora Mill), Manchester. Directions & Parking Info Here. (For safety and storm closure information, check here

    Tickets:

    WACNH Members, UNH Students and Staff- Free

    General Public- $10

    Katherine Brown will be talking about her new book Your Country, Our War:The Press and Diplomacy in Afghanistan. Over the course of her time in Afghanistan, Katherine Brown witnessed how the press interact and impact diplomacy in the country. 

    About Your Country, Our War:The Press and Diplomacy in Afghanistan

    Release Date: March 2019


    Journalists are actors in international relations, mediating communications between governments and publics, but also between the administrations of different countries. American and foreign officials simultaneously consume the work of U.S. journalists and use it in their own thinking about how to conduct their work. As such, journalists play an unofficial diplomatic role. However, the U.S. news media largely amplifies American power. Instead of stimulating greater understanding, the U.S. elite, mainstream press can often widen mistrust as they promote an American worldview and, with the exception of some outliers, reduce the world into a tight security frame in which the U.S. is the hegemon. This has been the case in Afghanistan since 2001, particularly as emerging Afghan journalists have relied significantly on U.S. and other Western news outlets to report events within their government and their country. 

    Based on eight years of interviews in Kabul, Washington, and New York, Your Country, Our War demonstrates how news has intersected with international politics during the War in Afghanistan and shows the global power and reach of the U.S. news media, especially within the context of the post-9/11 era. It reviews the trajectory of the U.S. news narrative about Afghanistan and America's never-ending war, and the rise of Afghan journalism, from 2001 to 2017. The book also examines the impact of the American news media inside a war theater. It examines how U.S. journalists affected the U.S.-Afghan relationship and chronicles their contribution to the rapid development of a community of Afghan journalists who grappled daily with how to define themselves and their country during a tumultuous and uneven transition from fundamentalist to democratic rule. Providing rich detail about the U.S.-Afghan relationship, especially former President of Afghanistan Hamid Karzai's convictions about the role of the Western press, we begin to understand how journalists are not merely observers to a story; they are participants in it.

    About Katherine Brown


    Katherine Brown, Ph.D., assumed leadership of Global Ties U.S. on April 9, 2018.

    Katherine brings a wealth of experience from the media, nonprofit, and academic sectors, as well as the U.S. government. She is highly regarded in the international affairs and public diplomacy arena as a strategic, forward-thinking leader.

    From 2013-2016, Katherine Brown served as Executive Director of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, a body authorized by Congress to oversee and promote U.S. government activities that intend to understand, inform, and influence foreign publics. Most recently, she was a Public Policy Manager at Facebook, Inc. where she was also in residence as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow.

    Previously, she held numerous roles in government, including assistant to the White House national security adviser; communications adviser for the U.S. Embassy in Kabul; and professional staff member of the Committee on Foreign Affairs at the U.S. House of Representatives.

    Katherine also served on the boards of the Center on Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California and the Global Ties Foundation. She is a non-resident senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and an adjunct assistant professor at Georgetown University.

    She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in communications from Columbia University and B.A. from the George Washington University.

    Presented in partnership with UNH Manchester's homeland security, history, humanities and politics and society programs.

         

    • Wednesday, March 20, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Red River Theatres
    • 110
    Register

    Finding Refuge: Crossroads Film and Discussion Series

    Anote's Ark

    Wednesday, April 17th, 7 PM

    Red River Theatres 

    11 S Main St #L1

    Concord, NH 03301


    Tickets are free for the public, but space is limited. Reserve your tickets today!

    About Anote's Ark

    What happens when your nation is swallowed by the sea? With the harsh realities of climate change looming, the low-lying Pacific nation Kiribati must find a new solution for the survival of its people. With sweeping cinematography, Anote's Ark interweaves two poignant stories. Anote Tong, endearing president of the island, races to find options-advocating in international climate negotiations and even investigating building underwater cities. At the same time, warm and sharp-witted Sermery, a young mother of six, tackles every struggle with humour. She must decide whether to leave the only culture she knows on the island and migrate to a new life in New Zealand. Anote's Ark captures the next evolution in the shifting dynamics of climate change-one where borders, technology, and global treaties are urgent and can change daily life as we know it. This portrait of the Kiribati people exudes strength of character and grace as they confront the inevitable change they are facing head-on.

    Watch the Trailer:

    This project was made possible with support from New Hampshire Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities. Learn more at www.nhhumanities.org

    • Wednesday, April 17, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Red River Theatres 11 S Main St #L1 Concord, NH 03301
    • 110
    Register


    Finding Refuge: Crossroads Film and Discussion Series 

    Fire at Sea

    Wednesday, February 27th, 7 PM

    Red River Theatres 

    11 S Main St #L1

    Concord, NH 03301

    Tickets are free for the public, but space is limited. Reserve your tickets today!

    About Fire at Sea:

    Situated some 200km off Italy's southern coast, Lampedusa has hit world headlines in recent years as the first port of call for hundreds of thousands of African and Middle Eastern migrants hoping to make a new life in Europe. Rosi spent months living on the Mediterranean island, capturing its history, culture and the current everyday reality of its 6,000-strong local population as hundreds of migrants land on its shores on a weekly basis. The resulting documentary focuses on 12-year-old Samuele, a local boy who loves to hunt with his slingshot and spend time on land even though he hails from a culture steeped in the sea.

    Watch the Trailer:


    This project was made possible with support from New Hampshire Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities. Learn more at www.nhhumanities.org


*We encourage advance registration for all of our programs. For events with a ticket price, online payments can be made using PayPal. If you prefer to register or pay over the phone, please contact our office: 603.314.7970



 

WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL OF NH
SNHU - 2500 N. River Road - Manchester - NH - 03106
council@wacnh.org - (603) 314-7970

WACNH is an independent, non-profit, educational organization located on the campus of SNHU. © 2010-2018

    


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